noviembre 2017

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VIDEO: Excavator walks a tightrope


We saw a dozer do it and we thought, surely no one else is dumb enough to try something like this. Turns out we were kind of wrong.

I say “kind of” because this scenario is a far more controlled situation than that dozer attempt we first saw a couple years back. This is a stunt coordinated by Chinese equipment manufacturer Sany with one of the company’s excavators tethered to a crane should the unthinkable happen.

Despite the tether, this is still clearly a feat that takes a fair amount of operator skill (and probably a lot of practice). Check out the video and its overdramatic editing below.

Source:: Equipment world

Vermeer ECO75, VX75 vacuum excavators fill mid-range gap


McLaughlin’s ECO75 vacuum excavator

The Vermeer ECO75 and VX75 from McLaughlin are designed to fill a gap in the mid-range vacuum excavator market, for use on compact job sites, production potholing, setting power poles or fluid management during directional drilling, the company says.

Both the ECO75 truck-mounted and VX75 trailer-mounted vacuum excavators feature a 5-inch boom option designed to pull more material and reduce clogging.

The vacuum blower produces 1,200 cubic feet per minute, and the water pump can provide up to 3,000 pounds per square inch of pressure. They are both powered by a 74-horsepower Deutz Tier 4 Final engine, which is designed to reduce fuel consumption.

Spoil tank capacities come in 500, 800 or 1,200 gallons.

The VX75 can be pulled by a 1-ton truck. The ECO75 with a 500-gallon spoil tank can be mounted to a single-axle truck with 26,000-pound gross vehicle weight. Under this option, the driver does not need a CDL. The 800-gallon spoil tank option can be mounted on a single-axle, 16-foot truck bed with a gross vehicle weight of 33,000 pounds. Other options for the vacuum excavators include a sewer jetter or an air compressor.

They come standard with McLaughlin’s three-stage cyclonic filtration system, which allows for both wet and dry vacuum excavation, and cam-over hydraulic rear door, which keeps the door to the spoil tank sealed without additional clamping requirements, even under reverse pressure, the company says. McLaughlin also put no components inside the tank, which keeps all maintenance on the outside.

Source:: Equipment world

Talbert 55CC-RP trailer made to haul road equipment


Talbert’s new 55-Ton Roller Paver trailer can handle such heavy equipment as rollers, pavers, excavators and dozers.

Talbert also designed the 55CC-RP trailer with dual kingpin settings, so it can be operated empty without a permit in states with 43-foot kingpin laws. Talbert achieved this by adjusting the trailer’s deck length, gooseneck radiuses and rear ramps from previous roller paver models.

The trailer’s overall length is 53 feet, so no need for an overlength permit in certain states. It has a 12.5-foot rigid-load base rating, a 24-foot clear deck length in the well and 20-inch cross member spacing along with auxiliary cross members on the lower deck. It has three axles that are close-coupled, and it can accept optional pin-on axles for loads requiring four axles in a row, the company says.

Low-profile equipment can be loaded onto the 22-inch-high deck with the tapered ramps at the front of the trailer. The trailer has a 6-inch road clearance. At 41 inches, the ramps are 9 inches longer than typical trailers, the company says. Their widths can also be adjusted.

Talbert designed the rear slope to accommodate asphalt and soil rollers and provided the option of open center sections for excavator booms to reduce load height. Because of its full-width, rear-bridge fenders equipped with 1.5-inch Apitong wood, equipment can be driven over the trailer’s wheels onto the bed.

The trailers are made of heavy-duty T-1 steel and corrosion-resistant Valspar R-Cure 800 paint.

Source:: Equipment world

Fla.-based Linder to distribute Atlas GMBH equipment in U.S.


Atlas 190 W wheeled excavator

Linder Industrial Machinery has become the exclusive importer and primary U.S. distributor for all Atlas GMBH products, except its cranes.

The German-based Atlas manufactures wheeled, crawler and railroad excavators, material handlers and wheel loaders.

Linder, based in Plant City, Florida, has 18 locations throughout the Southeast and has sold and distributed Atlas products for over three years.

Atlas says it looks to Linder to help grow its market share and expand its dealer network in the United States.

Linder has been in the equipment distribution business since 1952. Atlas has been manufacturing equipment sine 1919. Along with products under the Atlas brand, it makes Schaeff hydraulic cutting equipment and tunnel excavators.

Source:: Equipment world

Mich.’s new Flex Route can cut travel time in half, MDOT says


Drivers on Michigan’s U.S. 23 north of Ann Arbor are experiencing a new traffic management system called Flex Route, in which they can use the inside median shoulder during rush hours.

Overhead signs direct drivers when the additional lane is available. A green arrow means it’s open, while a red “X” means it’s closed. Along with rush hours, it can be used for special events and traffic accidents, according to the Michigan Department of Transportation. Overhead digital signs also post recommended speed limits.

“Using this innovative system is a more economical way to manage peak-hour congestion and increase safety along the corridor,” says MDOT University Region Engineer Paul Ajegba.

MDOT says opening the median to traffic can cut travel time in half and reduce secondary crashes. MDOT personnel monitor the system 24 hours a day by cameras installed along the route, the agency says.

The Flex Route, between M-14 and M-36, is part of a $92 million project along the corridor that included replacing and repairing bridges, extending and upgrading ramps, repairing pavement and expanding Intelligent Transportation Services (ITS) technology, MDOT says.

Source:: Equipment world

Tolls could go up for N.H. turnpike drivers


Hampton toll plaza on Blue Star Turnpike. Photo: NHDOT

Tolls could rise on New Hampshire’s turnpike system under a proposal being considered to accelerate bridge and road work on the tollways.

Tolls would rise 50 cents in Hampton, Hooksett and Bedford, and 25 cents in Dover, Rochester and Hampton Side Tolls, according to the New Hampshire Department of Transportation. Drivers with E-ZPasses would see rises of 35 cents and 18 cents, respectively.

The increase is expected to bring in an extra $36 million a year that NHDOT says would be used to relieve congestion, improve safety and speed up construction projects on the 89-mile turnpike system.

The agency also says that 54 percent of the additional revenue would come from out-of-state drivers.

A public hearing on the proposal is scheduled for 6 p.m. December 4 at the Portsmouth Public Library.

Source:: Equipment world

More people over 75 licensed to drive


A record number of people had driver’s license in the United States in 2016, with the highest increase among those aged 75 to 79, according to the Federal Highway Administration.

In all, 221.7 million people were licensed to drive last year. About one-fifth of them were 65 or older.

The 75-79 age group saw a nearly 5 percent increase in licensed drivers. The second-highest increase in licensed drivers was for those 85 and older, up 4.62 percent.

The FHWA says it is working to address the increase in older drivers through safety improvements, such as using retroreflective laminates to make highway signs more visible.

More younger drivers were also licensed in 2016, with teen and millennial age groups rising slightly, FHWA says. Millennials, ages 20 to 34, made up one-fourth of all licensed drivers. Teenage drivers increased to the highest level since 2013, but remain at among the lowest levels since the data began being compiled in 1963.

The FHWA also reports that the number of women with driver’s licenses outnumbered male licensed drivers by 2.5 million in 2016.

Source:: Equipment world

Shilling joins Skelly and Loy as geo-environmental scientist


Mallory Shilling.

Skelly and Loy, a Pennsylvania-based engineering and environmental consulting firm, announced that Mallory Shilling has joined the company as a Geo-Environmental Scientist.

Shilling assists with site evaluations, research, field sampling, and technical report preparation for all phases of Environmental Site Assessments. She also conducts necessary sampling and oversight of emergency spill cleanup through the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) agency-wide contract.

Shilling has performed underground storage tank removal site assessments and necessary reporting through the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PA DEP). She also has experience with environmental sampling, data evaluation, and report preparation as part of the PA DEP Act 2 Environmental Cleanup and Brownfields Program.

Shilling has a Bachelor of Science degree in Environmental Biology with a Minor in Environmental Geology from Edinboro University of Pennsylvania and is a member of the Geological Society of America, Society of Women Environmental Professionals Three Rivers Chapter, and the American Society of Highway Engineers Franklin Section.

Source:: Equipment world

The Nikola Zero is a 550-hp electric UTV informing development of the company’s semi truck


Nikola Motor Company (NMC) has positioned itself to rival electric auto-maker Tesla for the crown of trucking’s King of Alternative Power, but much like Elon Musk and his various side businesses, Nikola founder Trevor Milton has also diversified his team’s talents.

Next year, NMC will debut its Nikola Zero utility vehicle (UTV), targeting military applications with its four-seat dessert runner. Milton says secondary uses cover a range of work and recreation, including the mining segment which has increasingly turned to UTVs for their compact size and ability to handle aggressive terrain. However, UTV emissions can be deadly deep in a mine shaft.

Enter the all-wheel-drive Nikola Zero. The Zero squeezes upwards of 550 hp from its silent, emission-free, electric motors. That’s more than three times the horsepower available from a Polaris RZR Turbo Fox.

On a 46 mile trek through the St. George, Utah desert, the pre-production Zero absolutely obliterated every sandy dune and rocky ledge that was thrown in its path. And in a few cases, it dusted more well-known players in the segment like the RZR and Can Am.

Torque peaked at about 470 lb. ft. while scaling sheer ledges and navigating hairpin turns – no easy feat for a vehicle loaded down with 800-plus pounds of four grown men acting like kids in the dessert.

There’s so much power coming from each wheel that the UTV doesn’t even need all four to operate. For example, in the event the user were to snap a rear axle and linkage, the Nikola Zero can still squeeze enough torque and power from what’s left of the driveline to get the driver and his group back to basecamp.

Gear selection is made via a waterproof screen mounted to the dash, which also holds all the Zero’s vital signs like remaining battery life and usage.

Battery usage varies. The more demanding the terrain, the more juice is needed to plow across it. Over the course of the day, we averaged about 740 Watt Hours per mile and used a total 34 kWh – about 33 percent of the battery’s capacity. At an average usage rate of 740 Watt Hours per mile, the electric Zero would give a user a range of about 130 miles.

Top speed on the trip was about 57 mph thanks mostly to the rocky and sometimes crowded terrain, but Milton says the Zero features a peak speed of 80.

We hit our top speed in 4.2 seconds while roaring through a sandy patch but Milton says the Zero is capable of a 3.9 60-time under better conditions, and I believe it. The Zero takes off like a missile.

The Zero’s ride stance is 72-inches, making it measurably more narrow than other players in the UTV segment, and it provides 20 inches of travel. Its 14.5-inch ground clearance is about an inch and a half more than a Can Am Maverick and was more than enough to glide over most obstacles and debris.

The Zero’s low center of gravity comes from its floor-mounted battery, giving the drive a sticky feel even in loose-traction conditions.

The battery, encased in a Kevlar-reinforced housing and floated in its enclosure, is further protected by a skid plate, which also acts like a battering ram during rocky climbing. It must have beat and clanged off the mountainside a half-a-dozen times, emerging each time no worse for wear.

Weekend warriors aren’t known to be easily satisfied with stock side-by-sides, and the aftermarket for the Zero will need to develop. However, Milton says there are already plans in place to do just that.

Among the upfits Nikola expects to provide is a top-mounted solar panel that can charge the Zero, which can also power ancillary devices. Don’t want to opt for the solar panel? You can charge the Zero with a generator.

Milton says common upfits like radios and lights would be a “fractional and inconsequential” drain on the Zero’s range and battery life.

The high-performance dessert runner is more than a plaything in a life-size sandbox. Milton says many of the elements his team used on the Zero – like its stability control, torque vectoring, over-the-air updates, autonomous software and hardware, steer by motor, and battery characterization – will make its way to the Nikola One tractor when production gets underway.

Nikola burst on to the scene early last year with big power numbers and unconventional means of power delivery – namely a hydrogen fuel cell and electric drivetrain. But if the Zero is an indicator of what Nikola’s tractor could be capable of – a validation lab of sorts – trucking is in store for an exciting ride.

Source:: Equipment world

Gradall’s new XL 3300 V wheeled excavator can dig at any side without outriggers


Beyond a new, more fuel efficient Tier 4 Final engine, Gradall has introduced an updated model of its XL 3300 wheeled excavator that also boasts an improved electrical system.

The XL 3300 V is a 4×4 wheeled excavator capable of being driven up to 20 miles per hour both on and off pavement. Gradall says the 39,295-pound machine is also the only on-/off-highway excavator that “can work at the front, rear or either side of the undercarriage without the need to lower its optional outriggers or optional grading blade for extra stability.”

The machine is powered by a 5.1-liter Volvo Penta TAD571 VE engine providing 173 horsepower. The new engine reduces fuel use by 5 percent over the previous generation XL 3300. The upgraded 24-volt electrical system creates “a better power source,” Gradall says. (More specs are below.)

A full-time 4-wheel drive transfer case delivers power from the hydraulic drive motor to the drive axles, which are outfitted with wet-disc brakes.

The machine’s telescoping, full-tilting boom positions buckets, hammers, grapples, shears and other attachments without losing power, Gradall says, while a short tail swing allows the XL 3300 V to work along highways with “minimal traffic interruption.”

The XL 3300 V provides operators with a full view of the entire boom when working. The cab features a large seat with integrated joysticks and a switch that allows for choosing between the Gradall, Deere or SAE joystick patterns. Foot pedal controls carry out repositioning.

Quick specs

Source:: Equipment world